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Anxiety General Blog

Anxiety General Blog (69)

  Hi, I'm a blogger at http://shygirladventurer.blogspot.com/  I am trying to go on a bunch of fun adventures that take me out of my comfort zone to help me overcome my social anxiety. For my ultimate adventure, I will volunteer abroad in Nepal for a couple of months. Check out this ridiculous adventure I decided to go on. So, I somehow convinced myself that this was going to be a good idea. Everyone reassured me that it was a fine idea when I explained it, so I felt okay about it. Here is a graphic representation of what I envisioned along with a poem that inspired me. The idea was that I would buy a balloon and give it away. This is how I saw it. A great time, framed by this whimsical poem of spring. I imagined that I would be a little awkward like Cummings' balloon man, but I would make people happy. That's not quite how it went. First, I went to the party store. I picked out a big monkey balloon. A big monkey balloon. I tied it to a hair band around my wrist. I drove to a store I was not accustomed to. I felt lost as I wandered through the isles looking for someone to give the balloon to.  I felt like people were staring at me because I was carrying a giant monkey balloon. They were. I knew I should look them in the eye and smile. I think they were grinning…
Saturday, 02 March 2013 20:31

Flaws Galore.

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Okay, So we all know the term 'Nobody's perfect', yet we find ourselves constantly comparing ourselves to others. Perhaps it's just how society has been and will always be, but if we work at gaining self-confidence, maybe we can cut the 'constantly' to a mere 'occasionally'. What I have learned is this, the best way to conquer your flaws is to flaunt them. Yeah, that sounds a bit weird most likely, but your true friends and loved one's won't even mind! So let's say you're someone who is really self-conscious their teeth... they aren't perfectly straight, sure as hell aren't white, so you rarely ever smile, and when you do you clasp your hand over your mouth. Stop doing that. Yes, that is obviously a lot easier said than done, but as I said before, no one really cares. They may think it's a bit odd, but who are they to judge? Everyone suffers from flaws and therefore, they are not in the place to judge you. Also, know that you're not alone in your flaw. There are probably people out there who are just like you! There's a poem by Shel Silverstein called 'Masks' and if you haven't read it yet, I highly suggest you do! Also, if you have time, Desiderata by Max Ehrmann is a great poem to live by. So what are your flaws? Maybe you'll find someone just like you on here!
Friday, 22 February 2013 12:43

How to treat Anxiety naturally?

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Do you remember the last time when you felt anxious? Possibly, when you spent sleepless night before your exam or perhaps did not get job when you were in an urgent need of it. These situations normally create temporary anxiety that fades away after some time. However, some people having Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) find it hard to control their worries. People with GAD always worry about health, school, money, family. They get various physical symptoms like headaches, insomnia, trembling, weakness, sweating, muscle tension, irritability and many others. The daily life of people, suffering from anxiety disorder, becomes hell. Many people fall into the cycle of anxiety because they do not get the right help and advice at an earlier stage. I'm saying this because I went through the same thing around 8 years ago and faced the debilitating effects of it. Now, I am completely recovered from this problem and want to dedicate my life to helping others. Therefore, I am sharing here some simple tips that will help you to treat anxiety yourself. Negative Self-Talk Sucks: However, several factors such as environmental factors, medical factors, substance abuse, or a mixture of these can be the reason of anxiety but it is most commonly triggered when we regularly talk or think negative about ourselves that means a habit of always assuming ourselves responsible for the worst will happen. Shad Helmstetter, author of "What to Say When you Talk To Yourself" has done a lot of researches to understand the process of…
Sunday, 03 February 2013 04:01

Bipolar Bandit's Story

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Hi! My name is Michelle Hughes, otherwise known as "Bipolar Bandit". I run a Facebook page, a Pinterest board that is a great resource for most mental illnesses, a Twitter page, and I blog. I have been advocating for people with mental illnesses for about 20 years. I recently started an Advocacy Group on Facebook. I am looking forward to sharing my diary here on Anxiety Social Net. Since I already have been blogging, I suggest that you check my blog to find out more about what I stand for and how I have been advocating, and more about who I am. My newest project is to spread the news about a petition that I think makes a lot of sense. We, as advocates, have so many ideas of what needs to change and even have solutions of how they can change. The first obstacle is to get people with influence (media, politicians, actors, musicians, athletes, etc) to hear us. I think this petition will get that started. I am asking that each state come up with a plan for Mental Illness Awareness Week(MIAW). This will not cost too much money, if any and I believe it is something that both Democrats and Republicans can agree on. I hope you take a few moments to read the petition, sign it, and share it with others. We need to get our voice heard! If the NFL can dedicate a whole month to Breast Cancer Awareness, then I think that an organization…
Anxiety is a form of stress that not only affects the way you feel and act but also has an impact on your physical health and appearance. I went through many years of debilitating social anxiety and I journalled the effects it had on my physical health and appearance. I noted an increase in hair loss, a deterioration of skin appearance, increased muscle tension and increased skin sebum. But are these symptoms typical of anxiety? In observing many of the physical symptoms of those who suffer anxiety I can say with confidence that hair loss is certainly not a guaranteed result of prolonged anxiety. In fact many anxiety sufferers can go for years suffering the condition without any major impact on their hair growth. However, emotional stress does have an impact on physical health, which undoubtedly affects the appearance of skin and hair; whether it causes increased acne or worsening of hair health, or other visible physical symptoms. How does stress affect your hair? Several studies, including a UCLA study on mice in 2010, have demonstrated that stress causes hair loss. In the UCLA study the researchers used a drug to block the stress hormone “corticotrophin-releasing factor” and hair loss ceased or reversed as a result. When the mind is in a state of anxiety, proteins from the thymus or lymph glands are converted to sugar for instant energy. Continued anxiety makes the body draw on further nutrients to compensate. This process releases free-radicals, which in turn necessitates a increased…
Thursday, 17 January 2013 07:45

Taking it Slow

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Learning to take little steps is a huge step towards recovery from social anxiety disorder. Yep, it's true! Weird as that may sound. It is logical though, although it may seem as though you are simply enabling the anxiety for a long time. But think about it, if you constantly put yourself in the most anxiety provoking situation you can, and then panic, you are only building up a great evidence base that that situation Will ALWAYS make you panic. It took me ages to learn this, and I used to always beat myself up because I hadn't managed a situation as well as I 'should' have. I hated the fact that I couldn't eat out. Couldn't go to parties. Couldn't sing in public. Because as far as I was concerned, I SHOULD be doing all those things, without ANY anxiety whatsoever! This is simply not the case. It works like this. The more you force yourself into situations which you aren't ready to manage, the more evidence you have that you CAN'T manage them. The littler steps you take, the less likely you are to panic. The more little steps you succeed in taking without panicking, the bigger backlog of evidence you have to prove that you CAN manage your anxiety. Once you have this evidence that you can manage your anxiety in little steps, then you can slowly move on to a bigger little step. Keep doing this, until you finally reach a point where you are happy.…
Sunday, 13 January 2013 12:43

Be An Active Patient

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Is medication the only way to deal with anxiety? What we all need is to understand that medication is an aid to recovery.  It’s a shame that long term sufferers are not given better help to overcome their illness. While every case is different and some more traumatic in how the illness has developed or evolved, there is always a way to help. The human mind is a powerful tool and is underestimated in its ability to heal and recover as so much of it is used needlessly in sustaining thought patterns and functions that are detrimental. This has long been documented that the human brain operates in this way to adapt to survive. When we are a child and learning it is a regular occurrence- don’t touch that it’s hot, yet a child will out of curiosity and the need to learn ignore warning, but, the pain felt registers in the brain- don’t touch that it’s hot and will hurt. As an adult we form self education we develop the ability to create opinion and apply it. However, this means we stop wishing to learn as we believe we have made all the right risk assessments and no longer need to learn. We know now not to touch a hot stove; we understand to look both ways when crossing the road. We don’t however always apply this when it comes to our health. We like to be told by people who did carry on learning what is best. Every…
Sunday, 06 January 2013 01:07

Putting in the work

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Coming to the realisation that getting better from Social Anxiety Disorder was going to involve more than a quick fix, was the first real step I came to in finally starting to recover. I was 22 or 23 when I made that decision, and I'd had severe S.A.D since I was 11. For years, although I knew something was wrong, and that I was far more 'nervous' of doing things than other people, I refused to listen to people telling me that I had to work hard to fix the problem. I honestly thought it would just eventually go away. That I'd 'get over it'. That one day I simply wouldn't have to deal with it any more. For my entire time at high school I played the avoidance game. I became very good at giving excuses, making up little 'white lies', being 'sick' at invonvenient times or just not doing things. My friends and family came to simply 'accept' that that's what I did. It stopped seeming weird. In fact, if I had done something different, they probably would have made a big deal out of it - which maybe made me even less likely to try and change. It wasn't until I'd dished out big money for a university degree only to find myself unable to sit in a lecture theatre without nearly fainting or vomiting that I finally started to accept I might need help.  Sure - I'd seen counsellors galore up until then, but leaving home…

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