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Anxiety General Blog

Anxiety General Blog (66)

Tuesday, 19 June 2012 20:55

In Vivo Desensitization to Treat Anxiety

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Desensitization Therapy In Vivo Desensitization is defined as:A variation of systematic desensitization in which the anxiety-arousing situations to which the person is exposed are real, rather than imagined.This differs from Flooding, another technique for treating Anxiety, by using a more measured approach to treating Anxiety. Typically, with In Vivo Desensitization, the patient is gradually exposed to the actual feared stimulus over a period of sessions based on a hierarchical list of Anxiety evoking stimuli. The treatment is based on the theory that the fear response has been conditioned and that avoidance of the fear maintains the fear. The idea is that through exposure to the stimulus, this harmful conditioning can be “unlearned”. How does it all work? Well back in 1958 John Wolpe developed a method of a creating a hierarchical list of anxiety evoking stimuli in order of intensity which allows patients to undergo adaption.Wolpe further writes: “An Anxiety hierarchy is the thematically related list of anxiety evoking stimuli, ranked according to the amount of anxiety they evoke. There are a number of considerations in constructing desensitization hierarchies. First, suitable themes have to be identified around which anxiety-evoking stimuli can be clustered. Second, clients can be introduced to interviews in which therapists focus on other problems using other methods. A record is then kept of all scene presentations and their outcomes.The sessions range in length of exposure and typically gets longer as the patient gets more into advanced stages. Step by Step As one of my largest fears is…
Saturday, 02 June 2012 21:00

My Anxiety Journey: Introduction

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I started having problematic anxiety when I was 14 years old (I am now nearly 26). The combination of puberty hormones and all the life-changes high school entailed proved a toxic combination, triggering the change from High-StrungAshley to MentallyDisorderedAshley. Intense anxiety kept me from attending my classes, depression kept me on the couch, unshowered, pajama’d, crying sporadically, and obsessed with bad television that would distract me, briefly, from my so-called life. This was my grade 9. Through talk-therapy, a very supportive and understanding family, hormone leveling (read: birth control pills) and “as needed‘ sedatives: I was able to get back into my life and keep things (mostly) under control. I had issues here and there in the years that followed, but for the most part - things were under control. It wasn’t until I was finishing second year at university that my dark cloud truly reared it’s ugly head again. One fateful day, started out as a fun day with all my friends, celebrating the end of second year; ended as the (still) reigning champ for worst day of my life. There are tons and tons of photos of that, the last day of second year. To this day, it makes me chuckle to see the smile on my face: I had no idea how my life was about to change. Two carloads of my closest friends were a half hour from home for a day of mini golf, laughs, and dinner. After dinner, one of the car’s wouldn’t start,…
Saturday, 26 May 2012 05:03

Anxiety: What it Means to Me

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Fear is a major part of my life. I’m scared to get up, scared to go to work, scared to come home from work, scared to go to sleep and also scared to do everything in between. It’s this fear that causes anger and pain. I know the thoughts I have are irrational and that my mind is playing tricks but the helplessness causes me to mentally “beat myself up” over it. what is anxiety to me: Fear, Anger, Embarrassment, Demotivation, Pain, Overwhelming Emotion, Strength, Hope. It is a pretty standard list, if you search anxiety and depression symptoms you are likely to find all of them listed; except two. Strength and Hope. The reason I have included these will become clear by the end of this blog. When I have a panic or anxiety attack I always get a pain down my left arm and a crushing feeling in my chest. After being on this site I have found that I am not alone in feeling this pain. However, I am always wary to dismiss it as just an attack as it’s always in my mind that this time it could be an actual heart attack! One of the main reasons I decided to write this was to push myself. If it embarrasses me, then so be it. There have been many times I have avoided doing things because I was scared of being judged, failing and making an utter fool of myself; but recently I made a conscious…
I would like to share my story with you all in hopes that it may help with your own situation. Allow me to explain a little about myself. I am 28 years old and have been suffering from anxiety pretty much my entire life. It wasn't until I was a teenager in highschool that I found out what social anxiety disorder was. I suffer from social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety, a mild form of agoraphobia and bouts of depression. completely withdrew from life and only went from work to home and that was it. I joined a group for people with Social Anxiety disorder on Facebook and saw a link to Anxiety Social Network and immediately it was like I had found my life line. When I joined I was severely depressed finding it hard to get out of bed most days. The best way I can describe the way I was feeling was disappointed that I was alive and looking for a way out. I thought about suicide constantly as my mind was filled with nothing but thoughts of ending my pain. I decided that I had to do something or I was going to end up dying by my own hand. I am introverted by nature and value my privacy very highly and I don't really confide in anyone. For some reason, after joining ASN I started to open up to the people here like I never thought was possible. I used my real name, location and picture…
Are you having a Panic attack? How to identify the signs and symptoms and how to manage panic attacks It can happen to anyone at any time: in the office, shopping center, while driving, or even while one sleeps at night. Suddenly, without any warning, an individual may feel frightened and extremely overwhelmed. All at once it feels as if the world is closing in around them and their anxiety levels rapidly rise. The overwhelming and intense fear and anxiety that the individual feels is seemingly neither justified, nor related to, the present situation. For individuals who have experienced a panic attack the experience can be extremely overwhelming and scary. The symptoms of a panic attack closely resemble those of a heart attack, but disappear usually within half an hour. When an individual experiences a panic attack for the first time they will most likely feel extremely scared and overwhelmed by the experience. It can be extremely scary to feel as if one has lost control of their emotions and anxiety levels. What Ca You DO? Have you or someone you know ever been impacted by this type of an experience? If so, the person affected will never forget the sensations and will most likely want some additional information regarding their panic filled experience. Information and supports are highly valuable so that individuals are better prepared if they ever face it again in the future. If an individual has not experienced a panic attack themselves then it is still extremely…
Wednesday, 29 February 2012 13:21

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

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Basic Facts And Information on (PTSD) Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that has often been misunderstood and stereotyped. When an individual experiences a significant stressful traumatic event the body will typically respond through the development of post-traumatic stress disorder. This response is healthy and normal in the short term. Post-traumatic disorder is a normal response for a person who has experienced a traumatic event in their life. Trauma is something that cannot be prepared for and comes into a person’s life unexpectedly. In an instant, a person’s world can be completely changed and the stability that was once there can be quickly lost. Individuals that have experienced trauma will experience post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms as they try to cope with and manage their traumatic experience. It is important that individuals that have experienced trauma understand that their symptoms are normal and that their experience of a trauma is what is abnormal. Post-traumatic stress disorder is characterized by having symptoms related to re-experiencing of the trauma, heightened awareness, increased anxiety levels, avoidance, irritability, substance abuse, and depression. There are many symptoms that individuals can develop who have PTSD. Every person with this disorder will respond to their trauma experience uniquely and will have symptoms that are unique to them as well. Individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder are at a significantly increased risk of the development of other psychological disorders and addiction than the general population. The majority of the time an individual that experiences a trauma will develop…
Monday, 27 February 2012 09:18

Panic Disorder Tips and Info

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Here Some Useful Information on Panic Disorders Individuals with a panic disorder experience sudden intense attacks of anxiety. These attacks are often repetitive and can occur at any time. These attacks are often referred to as panic attacks. Panic attacks will often arise unexpectedly in individuals. They can erupt suddenly and rapidly intensify. Some individuals mistakenly identify the symptoms of a panic attack as being a heart attack because of the similar symptoms of these two medical conditions. Panic attack symptoms are unique and individualized for each person. Individual experiencing a panic attack typically report symptoms such as chest pain, feeling faint, overwhelming fear of losing control, intense fear of death, upset stomach, difficulty breathing, a chocking sensation, feeling detached, sweating, chills, shaking, rapid heart rate, numbness in extremities, and hot flashes. Panic attacks must be experienced for at least 6 months and involve a majority of the symptoms above to be considered to be a panic disorder. Panic disorders can be experienced at the same time that an individual also has a different anxiety or psychological disorder. It is important that panic disorders, whether experienced as a singular disorder or as a compounded disorder, can be treated. Panic disorders can be treated and managed in the following ways. Antidepressant medications have been shown to be effective in the treatment of panic disorders. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) Prozac, Zoloft, and Paxil are commonly used to manage panic attack symptoms. Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), benzodiazepines, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs),…
Wednesday, 08 February 2012 15:19

Agoraphobia Info And Some Basic Tips

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Here some good tips and basic info to overcome agoraphobia Agoraphobia is an anxiety disorder in which an individual strives to avoid situations that are panic provoking. Those with agoraphobia often avoid situations where they feel trapped, often avoid leaving home, and typically avoid situations where they are concerned about feeling embarrassed, trapped, or helpless if they would begin to panic. These individuals often do not feel safe or calm in public settings. Individuals with agoraphobia can become so overwhelmed with fear of panicking in a public setting that they become trapped within their own home. Overcoming agoraphobia will require facing one’s fears. This can be extremely difficult for an individual with agoraphobia to do. However, medications and psychotherapy treatments have been shown to offer some people relief from their symptoms. Agoraphobia can occur in conjunction with other anxiety and psychological disorders. Individuals with this condition should resist closing themselves into an isolated existence. Although isolating oneself will be the natural instinctual response in someone with agoraphobia it is important to work to maintain relationships and activities in the community. The following are eight potentially effective ways that an individual can take to gain control over their agoraphobia. Make an appointment with a doctor. An individual with agoraphobia should find a doctor who they can work closely with to monitor and treat their symptoms. It can be extremely helpful to have a family member, friend, or loved one join the doctor appointments so that there is an additional information source…

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