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What are the symptoms of panic attacks?

Hi,

Usually I do promotions and I meet a lot of people. This year on one fair I had interesting experience. I met a girl that couldn't relax, she was shaking, sweating a lot and feel dizzy. On the last promotion she run away. I am worry for her, Could this be symptoms of panic attack?

Tnx
Category: Symptoms 8 years ago
Hillary
Asked 8 years ago

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hi yes in my expereince they are symptoms of panic attacks, you can always have butterflies in stomach shortness of breath best thing ive found do is comforting the person. hope this helps a little bit.
Shellybean_2011
Answered 8 years ago
Shellybean_2011

Lots of people have panic attacks, although they can affect people in different ways. Some people have only one, others may have them for many years. Some people have them every day, some people only once in a while. If you were to ask all of your friends if they had ever had a panic attack, it is very likely that at least one or two will have had the same experience. They are quite common and NOT a sign of serious mental or physical illness. Some non-serious physical conditions can cause symptoms similar to panic attacks. For example: certain medicines taken together; thyroid problems; drinking too much caffeine; pregnancy; low blood sugar; etc During a panic attack, our nervous system releases a flood of stress chemicals, including adrenaline and cortisol. These hormones rouse the body for emergency action (Fight or Flight). There is a negative correlation between our level of serotonin (released when we experience pleasure) and the level of cortisol (released when we are stressed). As our Serotonin level increases, our cortisol level reduces. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter responsible for rewarding behaviour, reinforcing behaviour and balancing moods. Similarly, diaphragmatic breathing stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, which is the cooling branch of the autonomic nervous system. By stimulating the release of endorphins (the body's natural opiates) we can counter the effects of adrenaline (butterflies in the stomach, trembling, tension, etc).
Kevin Patton
Answered 8 years ago
Kevin Patton

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